Early Intervention (IHP-download)

Early Intervention (IHP-download)
Early Intervention (IHP-download) Early Intervention (IHP-download) Early Intervention (IHP-download) Early Intervention (IHP-download)
Product Code: EIR-Download
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Early Intervention: The Impact of Relationship Education on Youth presents the results of HRC’s study of the effects of RE on youth participants. The study was conducted through post-class retrospective surveys administered to 6,988 youth taking one of HRC’s research-based RE curricula at their high school. Completion of the survey was voluntary, resulting in 4,565 youth who participated in the study. Students also were given the opportunity to submit testimonials about their experience.
 
Participants were asked to choose one close relationship in their life to reflect upon when responding to the survey questions. While there were a variety of relationships chosen, the most common were that of a parent, sibling, best friend, or romantic partner.
 
The findings presented herein highlight the positive impact of RE for youth participants, regardless of the relationship about which they reported. Participants described this positive impact across four relationship factors:
 
1. Developing Relationship Efficacy
 
·      82% of youth said they “agree,” “strongly agree,” or “very strongly agree” that because of their RE class they had the confidence to handle day-to-day challenges in their relationships (n=3,782).
 
·      82% of youth said they “agree,” “strongly agree,” or “very strongly agree” that they were now able to do the things necessary to settle conflicts (n=3,782).
 
·      82% of youth said they “agree,” “strongly agree,” or “very strongly agree” that they were confident that they could use positive communication skills in their relationships (n=3,726).
 
 
 
2. Developing Conflict Resolution Skills
 
·      78% of youth reported being “more” or “a lot more” respectful of others’ feelings during conflicts (n=3,707).
 
·      74% of youth reported that although they may be upset, they try to end conflicts “more” or “a lot more” often in a way that is satisfying to all involved (n=3,734).
 
3. Demonstrating Appreciation and Support
 
·      74% of youth reported sharing how much they care “more” or “a lot more” often (n=3,652).
 
·         81% of participants let their partner know “more” to “a lot more” often they appreciate their ideas or the things they do are appreciated (n=2,378).
 
·         80% of participants acted “more” to “a lot more” supportive and understanding toward their partner (n=3,734).
 
4. Decreasing Aggressive Behaviors and Hostile Interactions
 
·      82% of youth reported yelling and screaming “less” or “a lot less” often (n=3,348).
 
·      78% of participants reported using a disrespectful tone of voice “less” to “a lot less” often (n=2,954).
 
·      88% of participants reported punishing by withholding affection “less” to “a lot less” often (n=2,938).
 
·      82% of participants reported using hurtful and targeted insults “less” to “a lot less” often (n=2,371).
 
·      75% of youth reported working hard “more” or “a lot more” often to ensure no one in the relationship gets hurt, emotionally or physically (n=3,671).
 
Early Intervention: The Impact of Relationship Education on Youth helps us realize more clearly than ever before the value of RE as a potent early intervention, for Hispanic youth as well as for youth in general, during the important high school years.

 

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